Wansheng Zizhu Monastery 萬聖紫竹寺

Wànshèng Zǐzhú Monastery 萬聖紫竹寺 is an unusually austere temple located on the seaward slope of the Dadu Plateau 大肚台地 in Shālù 沙鹿, Taichung 台中. At first I assumed it was abandoned, for there was absolutely nobody around when I visited. The main hall is in an obvious state of disrepair and the two flanking buildings remain unfinished. After wandering into both altars I left with more questions than answers. Apart from the Pǔtuóshān White Temple 普陀山白衣道場 it isn’t at all like most other temples I’ve seen in Taiwan 台灣.

Further research into this mysterious temple has revealed a number of interesting details. First of all, this particular temple has been around since the early 1980s. The builders ran out of money before the flanking buildings could be completed—and clearly they haven’t been able to raise the necessary funds in the intervening decades.

This temple is part of a Chinese salvationist religion known in English as Zailiism and in Chinese as Zàilǐjiào 在理教 (“teaching of the abiding principle”) or simply Lǐjiào 理教. Founded in the 17th century but persecuted as an “evil religion” in imperial China, it exploded in popularity in the early years of the Republic of China and eventually claimed nearly 5,000 temples and 14 million adherents according to this article. Renewed persecution after the rise of communism spurned the founders to flee to Taiwan in 1949. Nowadays Zailiism claims 186,000 adherents in Taiwan and has, since the 1990s, resumed operations in China 中国.

Zailiism venerates Guānyīn 觀音 (formally: Guānshìyīn Púsà 觀世音菩薩), one of the most commonly worshipped gods in Taiwan, and blends Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism like most other Chinese folk religions. My admittedly inexpert impression is that these salvationist religions have a somewhat Protestant character, eschewing the more vibrant and ritualistic fixtures of temple culture in Taiwan for a more minimal aesthetic and ascetic lifestyle. Followers of this religion are instructed to avoid smoking, drinking, and recreational drugs altogether.

Related Posts