Skip To Content
Oblique shot of the Xizhou Chenggong Hostel 溪州成功旅社

Xizhou 溪州

Xizhou 溪州 is a small rural township in the southernmost reaches of Changhua 彰化 immediately across the river from Xiluo 西螺. It was formerly the site of a sugar factory.

Xizhou Chenggong Hostel 溪州成功旅社

Oblique shot of the Xizhou Chenggong Hostel 溪州成功旅社
An oblique shot of the historic Chenggong Hostel in Xizhou, originally built in 1921.

During a recent visit to Xizhou 溪州, a small rural township in southern Changhua 彰化, I made a brief stop to check out the historic Chénggōng Hostel 成功旅社. I had no idea what to expect, having learned of its existence while browsing Google Maps in search of points of interest, and was pleasantly surprised by what I found there. It is privately owned and operated but they’ve gone to some lengths to preserve the building as a tourist attraction and community space. The ground floor is home to a shop showcasing local products and a dual-purpose agricultural library and event space. Upstairs is something of a museum, lightly furnished with rickety beds and tatami mats. The floorboards creak and there is a mustiness about the place that makes it feel genuinely old. It wasn’t difficult to imagine what it might have been like half a century ago in the midst of the sugar boom.

Xizhou Telecom Bureau 溪州原電信局

The former Xizhou Telecom Bureau 溪州原電信局
Someone has turned the former Xizhou Telecom Bureau into a nursery.

This week I visited the small town of Xizhou 溪州 in southern Changhua 彰化 to locate the eponymous Xizhou Theater 溪州戲院. I found no way into the theater but made a serendipitous discovery while walking around the block in search of another access point. Across the street I noticed the utilitarian outline of the former Xizhou Telecom Bureau 溪州原電信局, a modest building that once housed a combined post office and service counter for the state phone company, then known as the Directorate General of Telecommunica­tions (DGT) 交通部電信總局. The sign above the entrance simply reads Diànxìnjú 電信局, or “telecommunications bureau”, which is all anyone needed to know in those days. Taiwan’s telecom monopoly was broken up in 1996 with the privatization of what became known as Chunghwa Telecom 中華電信. In the absence of any sort of historic information about this obscure abandoned office I’d guess it was built sometime in the late 1970s or early 1980s.

A Glimpse of Xizhou Theater 溪州戲院

The entrance to Xizhou Theater 溪洲戲院
The entrance to a vintage theater in the sleepy hamlet of Xizhou.

Some people are into urban exploration for the optics—they love visiting the most visually-impressive places and taking cool photos—but I’m more interested in solving puzzles and documenting history. Animated by curiosity, I have become proficient in navigating the Chinese language web in search of leads. Not all of these turn out to be something interesting but I enjoy those rare days where I set out into the countryside and see how many sites I can knock off my list.

Yesterday I went for a scooter trip around southern Changhua 彰化, primarily to give some love to Beidou 北斗, a vital center of trade and commerce in the late Qing dynasty era. Seeing as how Xizhou 溪州 is just next door I opted to drive over and check out two points on my map, one of which was highly speculative, in that I had recorded no address for it. I only knew there was a vintage theater somewhere on the west side of town—and in short order arrived at the entrance to the humble Xizhou Theater 溪州戲院.