Lost Among The Multitudes

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A lost cat poster on a mailbox in .

I wonder how many cats are lost every day? Certainly this number cannot be insignificant, for it is something almost every cat owner must address at one point or another. I have personally been involved in the search for lost cats on at least five occasions—and have probably made posters of my own at least three times. This particular poster up on the mountain in caught my eye for whatever reason—the unusually bold design, the melancholic appearance of raindrops on the plastic cover, or perhaps the forlorn look of the potentially doomed feline, its indeterminate fate depending on chance and circumstance. And are we not all lost as well? Put up a poster for yourself.

Victoria in the Golden Light

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Victoria’s upper harbour in the golden light of afternoon.

Time for another blast from the past! This is a lightly retouched version of a photograph I captured of the upper harbour in , , way back in 2008. Even then I was fascinated by the specific quality of light seen in the golden hour of afternoon.

Ascending Into The Stacks

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Riding an escalator to a higher level at Robarts Library, University of Toronto.

Now and then I like to go through some of my old photographs and give them new treatments in Adobe Lightroom. I have learned so much from all these years of working with the software—and I follow a very different approach nowadays: warmer and more nuanced, less outlandish and cold. It is an interesting experience to retouch my old work with the benefit of experience and new eyes.

Lizard On A Stick

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Dried lizards for sale in Vancouver’s Chinatown in 2007.

I saw these reptilian delicacies for sale in Vancouver’s Chinatown while visiting way back in 2007. Nobody believes me anytime I mention flayed lizard for sale so here it is—photographic proof! These are likely to be tokay geckos, a species used in traditional Chinese medicine for various indications, “male endurance” among them. They aren’t eaten whole—they are boiled along with various other ingredients to make a soup.

Traversing the liminal zone

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Gazing back through the passageway from one world to the next.

This was the last image I captured in prior to boarding a long haul flight to little more than a week ago. Pictured here is Tilted Spheres, a massive steel sculpture by Richard Serra, installed 2002–2004, prior to the opening of Pier F at Toronto Pearson International Airport in 2007. The building was actually constructed around this imposing monument to the ritual disorientation of international air travel.

The airport is a movement processing machine, which directs the passengers through its spaces to the aeroplane (and back out). It channels and directs the flow of passengers through both security and retail spaces. Serra’s Tilted Spheres requires an act of passage, the walls all tilt inwards as well as curving, creating a looming pathway to be traversed.

The sculpture slowly comes into view as the traveller descends the escalator from the mezzanine. After reaching the floor, a decision must be made: pass through one of the three channels or go around. I decided to pass straight through—and stopped in the middle to test the acoustic properties of the piece by clapping my hands together. Sure enough, there was a strange, reverberated echo, an alien sound ringing in my ears.

With an odd smile I continued on my way. 17 hours later I landed in distant lands.

An Exercise In Democracy

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Mississauga votes 2014.

I executed my right to vote in this election season. I can’t say I had strong feelings about any of the candidates but still went out to vote anyhow. Seems like not everyone felt the same for voter turnout was a paltry 36.6% or so. Spin the wheel and try again next time.