Wuri Stationmaster Residence 烏日車站舊站長宿舍

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The old stationmaster’s house in Wuri has been left to the elements for years. When will the city get serious about protecting its cultural heritage?

Today I breezed through southern on my way to the high-speed rail station and parts beyond. Along the way I made a brief stop in to follow up on a lead I uncovered while researching my much longer feature about the historic Wuri Police Station. Apart from the police station there are two other officially designated historic sites in the district (with nearby Jukuiju Mansion almost certain to become the fourth in the near future). One of these is the former Stationmaster Residence 站長宿舍 next to Wuri Station 烏日車站, pictured here. Despite its status as a heritage property the city has done nothing to restore it and little to maintain the old residence. About all they’ve done in recent years is put up metal fencing sturdy enough to prevent the intrusion of mildly curious explorers such as myself.

In the absence of a more thorough history that’s about all I have to say about this find. For a few more photos of this old ruin have a look at this blog from 2013. Finally, for those of you uncertain who or what a stationmaster is, Wikipedia has you covered.

A Glimpse of Xizhou Theater 溪州戲院

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The entrance to a vintage theater in the sleepy hamlet of Xizhou.

Some people are into urban exploration for the optics—they love visiting the most visually-impressive places and taking cool photos—but I’m more interested in solving puzzles and documenting history. Animated by curiosity, I have become proficient in navigating the language web in search of leads. Not all of these turn out to be something interesting but I enjoy those rare days where I set out into the countryside and see how many sites I can knock off my list.

Yesterday I went for a scooter trip around southern , primarily to give some love to , a vital center of trade and commerce in the late . Seeing as how is just next door I opted to drive over and check out two points on my map, one of which was highly speculative, in that I had recorded no address for it. I only knew there was a vintage theater somewhere on the west side of town—and in short order arrived at the entrance to the humble Xizhou Theater 溪州戲院.

An Abandoned House and Community Garden in Hsinchu

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A community garden on the urban frontier of Hsinchu. The traditional house behind the garden is abandoned.

Last weekend I visited and rented a scooter to visit some of the more distant areas from the central train station. Along the way my attention was drawn to this traditional home on the margins of the north side of town. Hsinchu, like most other cities in , is gradually replacing its agricultural frontier with modern subdevelopments, but this home has somehow escaped the wave of demolition that obviously swept through most of the rest of the area. The man in the picture had little to say before returning to his garden. Apparently the house beyond is a hundred years old—but anything more about its history will remain a mystery for now.

Jishan Gatehouse 積善樓

A Japanese colonial era gatehouse in Taichung.

Jīshàn Gatehouse 積善樓 (Mandarin pinyin: Jīshànlóu; sometimes Chishan or Chijhan) is a minor historic building not far from Taiyuan Station 太原車站 in , . Originally this site was occupied by the residences of the Lài 賴 family, immigrants from Zhangzhou, , who made their home here in 1897. Decades later they funded the construction of this unusual gatehouse on the recommendation of a fēngshuǐ 風水 master; the name of the building literally translates to “accumulate goodness”. The design and some of the materials are Chinese but the structure also shows western influences and craftsmanship as filtered through . Five banyan trees surrounding the gate are the only other legacy of the homes that once existed here. Nowadays the area is a city park.

A Derelict Entertainment Complex in Zhongli

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Deciphering the names of twin theaters in an abandoned entertainment complex in Zhongli.

Among the many disused and movie of is a massive entertainment complex home to twin cinemas: Qīnqīn Grand Theater 親親大戲院 and Láilái Grand Theater 來來大戲院. Located immediately across from the former Sogo department store in the heart of downtown, it remains unexplored insofar as I know. Several businesses still operate out of the ground floor of this hulking ruin and they don’t take kindly to strangers mucking about in search of an entrance to the upper levels.

On the Edge of the Changhua Railway Village 彰化台鐵宿舍村

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An abandoned apartment block near the entrance to the old railway workers’ village.

Featured here are a handful of photos and some notes from an incomplete exploration of the Changhua Railway Village 彰化台鐵宿舍村 (pinyin: Táitiě Sùshè Cūn) just across the street from the amazing Changhua Roundhouse 彰化扇形車庫 in . While living there in the winter of 2014–2015 I made several lazy attempts to gain access to the more interesting and historic parts of the old village without success (mainly due to all the wild dogs around). The only part of the village I was able to explore were some of the newer residential buildings on the edge of the block—which have much less aesthetic and historic value. That being said, since I’ve recently been filling in some archival content from my time in Changhua’s capital I decided to share these photos as well. This is not a full exploration by any means—so if I ever get around to seeing the rest of the old village I’ll be sure to update this post.

In Search of Salt on the Outskirts of Lukang

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A mysterious brick building on the outskirts of Lukang.

Several months ago, after researching and writing a piece about the Qingkunshen Fan-Shaped Saltern 青鯤鯓扇形鹽田 of , I ventured out to in search of the Lukang Saltworks 鹿港鹽場, a saltern that shut down in the 1960s. Whereas there are several good resources outlining the history of I found nothing similar for anything north of the Zhuóshuǐ River 濁水溪, the traditional dividing line between north and south . Turning to Google Maps I browsed satellite imagery for evidence of salt evaporation ponds (here is a historic photo of one of Lukang’s salt fields to give you an idea of what I was looking for). I soon noticed a street by the name of Yánchéng Lane 鹽埕巷, literally “Salt Yard Lane”, as well as several sites with grid-like structures obscured by overgrowth. When the opportunity arose to borrow a scooter in the area I jumped at the chance to put this cartographic sleuthing to the test. Was there any chance I’d find some relic of an industry that vanished half a century ago?

Traces of an Army Maintenance Depot

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A distinctive logo on the gateway to a former army logistics maintenance depot near Taipei 101.

is now one of the most expensive and upscale parts of but it hasn’t always been that way. Decades ago it was an undesirable area on the edge of the city with a significant military-industrial presence, traces of which still remain if you know where to look. The open expanse of parks and parking lots around the intersection of Xìn’ān Street 信安街 and Wúxìng Street 吳興街 immediately to the west of Taipei Medical University 臺北醫學大學 is one such trace.

The Remains of Dawu Theater 大武戲院

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Looks like an abandoned warehouse but this is actually the former Dawu Theater.

I stumbled upon the remains of Dawu Theater 大武戲院 while on a bicycle tour of southern Taiwan in 2015. Located in the small coastal settlement of , , it was in operation from 1969 to 1983. Taitung was home to 36 theaters in the cinematic heyday of the 1960s and 70s, all of which are now abandoned or destroyed. Hardly anything remains after three decades of exposure that would identify Dawu Theater apart from a small sign in the antechamber.

Have You Seen Him

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A series of stickers referencing the events of the Sunflower Student Movement.

Today I wandered by the former American embassy, now the Spot Taipei Film House 光點台北電影院 in , and noticed this series of stickers on the electrical transformers across the lane. In bold lettering it says: HAVE YOU SEEN HIM. I wondered what it meant—and it seems I’m not the only one. Turns out the man in the photograph was one of the police officers involved in evicting people from the Executive Yuan 行政院 in the early mornings hours of March 24th, 2014, during the Sunflower Student Movement. He was caught on camera beating protesters and, when student leaders demanded the police identify the officer, they initially claimed to not know his name or whereabouts. Later it was revealed that the officer was not even relieved of duty in the aftermath of that violent night.